BOOKS BY F.C. SHULTZ


The Mystery at Pancake Shores by F.C. Shultz

“The last time I saw the ocean was my first beach vacation to Pancake Shores in 1958.”

When the Thompson twins invite twelve year old Wilson to go to the beach with them in the summer of 1958, he couldn’t say no. This was way more exciting than going to the vacuum cleaner museum with his family. But, once the kids arrive at the beach house and find there’s no adult supervision, Wilson’s excitement turns to panic.

To his relief, Wilson makes a new friend on the pier who helps calm his anxieties for a moment. The moment only lasts until Wilson discovers something on the beach. Something that causes him to never return to the ocean for the rest of his life.


THE ROSE WEAPON by F.C. Shultz

It's been ten years since the fire beast last attacked Kilbo,

a small, coastal viking village. Hosperan, the young chief-to-be, must try his best to suppress the memories from the last time the beast attacked, when it killed the chief…Hosperan’s father.  
 
Now, Hosperan must figure out how to manage his conflicting beliefs about why the fire beast exists and what he should do about it. With the village against him, Hosperan turns to his deceased father’s legacy to guide him.  


Of Gods and Globes edited by Lancelot Schaubert,
Including the short story "Four Umbrellas" by F.C. Shultz

When the moon gets too close and too bright, it makes us crazy. Loony, even. 

In that spirit, editor Lancelot Schaubert rounded up sci-fi and fantasy writers to write about cosmic influence. The fantasy writers took a more mythological approach, speaking of the symbolic (or perhaps godly) Mercury and Mars and Neptune.

The sci-fi writers tell you what it’s like to live on Jupiter and Uranus. All of them, though, speak of the influence of what one writer called “the music of the spheres.” These are stories OF GODS AND GLOBES. They’re quite the ride: they made the editor laugh and cry and chilled him to the bone with terror. And one of the stories made him long for a home that… well for a home he doesn’t think he's ever been to before.